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Queens

Keeping an Eye on Kids’ Sight

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

At Steinway Eye Care in Queens, children’s glasses come in a wide variety of styles. 

“We’ve got rainbows, we’ve got balloons, we’ve got superheroes,” says Sam Pirozollo, the shop’s owner.

But for some kids who need glasses, the problem isn’t finding a pair they like, it’s about finding a pair they can afford. That’s where Tonya Daniels come in.

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Meet Queens’ ‘Qustodian’

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

Jeff Orlick gives Jackson Heights food tours under the moniker Jeffrey Tastes. He also has a second alter ego: The Queens Qustodian.

He’s less a superhero than a one-man cleanup crew armed with a box cutter. His target: Illegal street signs, among other urban blemishes.

Orlick patrols the neighborhood with a can-do spirit that’s both nervy and nonchalant. He’ll use a car jack to break the lock on a long-abandoned bike chain. He’ll slap “you park like an a—–e” stickers on cars with rears jutting out into the street. Or he’ll shimmy up a highway sign to cut down illegally posted ads.

As the Queens Qustodian, he wears a one-piece jumpsuit and a hat customized by the graffiti crew behind the olf Five Pointz graffiti Mecca in Long Island City. When he’s not giving tasting tours, curating the Viva La Comida food festival or cleaning up the borough, Orlick works a late shift in the control room at CBS.

A ‘Maple Street’ For Queens

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

To many members of the NYPD, Jack Maple was the crime-fighting genius who developed the CompStat tracking program credited with helping dramatically slash New York’s crime in the mid-1990s.

To the fashion-conscious, Maple was a dapper dresser, always clad in a bowler hat, bow tie and wing-tip shoes.

And to some Richmond Hill residents, “Jack Maple” might soon be the name of the street in their neighborhood.

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Kosher Soup Kitchen Struggles

Monday, April 7th, 2014

On a recent chilly afternoon in Queens, two women shivered in a line of about 50 people that trailed out the door of Masbia, a kosher food pantry and soup kitchen.

The first woman, from Manhattan, wore baggy pants. The other, from Queens, was clad in a long, draping skirt.

Their outfits signaled differences in how they interpreted proper Jewish dress for religious women, but both were there for the same reason: They needed kosher groceries, which are more expensive than average, as they try to live on less since food stamp reductions last November.

“When food stamps are cut, it’s hard to buy kosher,” said one of the women, Debbie Greenbaum of Queens.

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Marking World’s Fair History

Monday, March 31st, 2014

Street Vendors Told to Hit Road

Friday, December 27th, 2013

A Flight from Sandy to Santa

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

Relief Effort Faces Trust Issues

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Voices From a Vigil

Monday, November 18th, 2013