Immigration Anniversary Action

Saturday, November 21st, 2015

The first anniversary of President Obama’s court-challenged executive action aimed at sparing millions of immigrants from deportation prompted events around the city – ranging from a demonstration at City Hall to a renewed push for the DREAM Act to the showcasing of new software that strives to simplify the complex citizenship application process. Our team covered a busy day for immigration advocates.

Dozens of New Yorkers who would qualify for immigration relief under Obama’s executive actions flocked to City Hall to call on the U.S. Supreme Court to remove the final legal barrier to the White House plan. Olivia Leach reports.

Immigrants Seek Supreme Relief from NYCity News Service on Vimeo.



Some 200 young undocumented immigrants fighting for state financial aid to better afford an education gathered at John Jay College of Criminal Justice for the second annual conference of the CUNY DREAMers. It marked the latest chapter in a  four-year battle to pass the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. Danni Santana reports.

Pursuing a Shared DREAM from NYCity News Service on Vimeo.


More than 700,000 people were sworn in as new citizens between October 2014 and September 2015. But they represented less than 10 percent of the estimated 8.8 million immigrants eligible for citizenship.

Immigration Advocates Network introduced a new beta version of its CitizenshipWorks software this month. It’s a step-by-step online service that helps simplify the complex citizenship application. Developers say the aim is to do for citizenship paperwork what TurboTax has done for tax preparation. Andrew Menezes reports.

From Software to Citizenship from NYCity News Service on Vimeo.

Saying ‘Ja’ to College Beyond NYC

Saturday, October 24th, 2015

The cost of tuition at four-year public colleges has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years, while private college tuition has tripled over the same time period, according to College Board estimates.

Some 5,000 American study in Germany and an increasing number are looking to the European country as a higher education alternative, recruiters say. While U.S. students in Germany generally have to pay for their own housing, books and living expenses, tuition at public universities there is free.

The Goethe-Institut New York hosted an information fair and held workshops for prospective students to learn more about studying and working in Germany.

Pre-K Storybook Ending Wishes

Saturday, September 19th, 2015

City officials hoped that Mayor De Blasio’s landmark Universal Pre-K (UPK) program would draw 73,000 students in its second year, but only 65,000 youngsters have enrolled so far. Deputy Mayor Richard Buery wants parents to know they can still sign up their 4-year-olds for this school year by dialing 311, going to or texting “Pre-K” to 877-877 for assistance.

To help get the word out about the program, which costs city taxpayers $300 million annually, Buery joined Queens Borough President Melinda Katz at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the opening of a new Pre-K classroom in seemingly unlikely, but appropriate, spot: a Long Island City library.


Friday, May 29th, 2015

Punishing Push For School Sports

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

SPECIAL REPORT: Counterfeit Ed

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Questions Trail Charter School

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Winning Outside the Ring

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

A Backpack Full of Inspiration

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014