Immigration Anniversary Action

Saturday, November 21st, 2015

The first anniversary of President Obama’s court-challenged executive action aimed at sparing millions of immigrants from deportation prompted events around the city – ranging from a demonstration at City Hall to a renewed push for the DREAM Act to the showcasing of new software that strives to simplify the complex citizenship application process. Our team covered a busy day for immigration advocates.

Dozens of New Yorkers who would qualify for immigration relief under Obama’s executive actions flocked to City Hall to call on the U.S. Supreme Court to remove the final legal barrier to the White House plan. Olivia Leach reports.

Immigrants Seek Supreme Relief from NYCity News Service on Vimeo.



Some 200 young undocumented immigrants fighting for state financial aid to better afford an education gathered at John Jay College of Criminal Justice for the second annual conference of the CUNY DREAMers. It marked the latest chapter in a  four-year battle to pass the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. Danni Santana reports.

Pursuing a Shared DREAM from NYCity News Service on Vimeo.


More than 700,000 people were sworn in as new citizens between October 2014 and September 2015. But they represented less than 10 percent of the estimated 8.8 million immigrants eligible for citizenship.

Immigration Advocates Network introduced a new beta version of its CitizenshipWorks software this month. It’s a step-by-step online service that helps simplify the complex citizenship application. Developers say the aim is to do for citizenship paperwork what TurboTax has done for tax preparation. Andrew Menezes reports.

From Software to Citizenship from NYCity News Service on Vimeo.


Friday, June 19th, 2015

Seeking Asylum and a Future

Friday, June 19th, 2015

Elza Kochueva, a Brooklyn student, is from Russia and speaks Russian. But she looks Asian.

The young woman and her parents, Mongolian descendants from Russia, say there were persecuted in their homeland because of the way they look and their Buddhist beliefs.

Now the family faces a new crisis: possible deportation. Even as Elza Kochueva, who wants to become a lawyer, prepares to attend John Jay College of Criminal Justice in the fall, she and her parents are fighting a legal battle to remain in in the U.S.

They’ve been waiting for three years for their asylum application to be okayed. But a steep decline in approval for asylum petitions from Russian refugees has raised fears their American Dream will be dashed.


Friday, May 29th, 2015


Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Mexicans Seek Religious Holiday

Friday, November 29th, 2013

Teaching a Lesson on Citizenship

Saturday, November 23rd, 2013

NYCity Snapshot: How Can the New Mayor Help You?

Monday, November 4th, 2013

Families Rally for Detainees

Saturday, October 19th, 2013